Monday, May 25, 2009

No. 38


Beer: Miller High Life
Date: May 24th, 2009

Place: The Moffit's, West Hartford, CT

The fact that I was in the wealthiest state in the union, thereby being one of the wealthiest places in the entire world - and by the default the wealthiest place in the history of mankind - and I was drinking a a Miller High Life in a 46oz. plastic cup made my Memorial Day Sunday the most ironic in recent memory.

Our retreat from the liberal right coast wherein we reside took us to John and Stephanie's house in Connecticut. They are with child and due in a matter of weeks. If there is anything that I know about babies is that they put mommy and daddy out of the social sphere for a minute or two. I decided to seize the moment and head down west, after about .008% convincing for my wife. She wanted to get out into the open road as well.

I met John at the Patagonia store in Atlanta. We worked together. John was one of the people who showed me that a college degree didn't matter and if you were smart and well read and nice and with it you could hang in any crowd any time. After meeting John, I was kind of bummed that I'd spent so many years in college. This guy is going to go places. I don't know where. But somewhere.

John reminded me that I went to his apartment one night and watched a very sad and very disturbing movie. I had. Because we somehow ended up being neighbors in Atlanta for a few months, and I'd walked over and seen Charlize Theron acting sad and disturbing and I also think I watched Vertical Limit there, too, at some point.

Well, John did go places. For one, he went to Connecticut. To the wealthiest state in the union, to stock up on cheap beer, keep true to his roots, and get his something important degree at UConn where he sits in a lab and grows bacteria and sees what they do when introduced to other bacteria and write papers and get really well known in certain circles and become a dad.

We were both excited that he was going to be on the blog and we were going to share a beer in what we hope would become a much more frequent occurrence.

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